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Grand National 2018 - Ante-post Review

Blaklion Grand National 2018
It's that time again. 

When talk of Red Rum, Mr Frisk and toothless jockeys tell their opinion that this year 'I'm going to win the greatest steeplechase in the world.' 

The Grand National 2018 sends punters into a frenzy with the hope they will pick the winner. Saturday 14th April is the fixture of the Grand National.

It's a race steeped in history. 

But which horses are likely to be a big player on the day? The ante-post market is still rather open but that doesn't stop bookmakers from offering prices or websites from having an opinion. 

So what does the ante-post market tell us? 

At the time of writing, if you have a horse you fancy to go well or even win, then I'd suggest you take the price because bookmakers are giving 25/1 if not much bigger odds on every horse. 

Major hopes:

Nigel Twiston-Davies hasn't won the National since Bindaree prevailed in 2002 at odds of 20-1. 

Blaklion, a son of Kayf Tara, has proven he likes the course when finishing fourth last year behind One For Arthur. He was favourite that day when beaten less than nine lengths. Connections are limbering up for this April and this bay gelding returned in December to Aintree winning well over a distance of 3 mile 2 furlongs on heavy going. Just 7-4 favourite that day, but a remarkably consistent nine-year-old who could well be peaking at the right time. He has the experience and talent to make his mark at the highest level with a highest official rating of 161.   

With career earnings of almost £400,000, a Grand National win will propel him to almost a millionaire. 

Other horses who feature high in the pecking order of the National betting include:

Colin Tizzard's Native River. This eight-year-old chestnut gelding is a class horse. A winner of 9 races in his National Hunt career and achieving prize money over £400,000. In 2016, he won at Aintree and regular at Cheltenham. At present, this horse is priced 25-1 with bookmakers. 

Other notable prospects worthy of an interest include Paul Nicholls' Vincente. Plenty of layers giving 33-1 on this noble charge. 

Jonjo O'Neil last won the race in 2010 with Don't Push It, ridden by Tony McCoy when 10-1JF. Perhaps Minella Rock is your idea of this year's hero. 

The market is so open at present you may fancy a few selections. 

Cause Of Causes - Gordon Elliot 33-1. 

Definitely Red - Brian Ellison - 33-1.

The Last Samuri - Kim Bailey 40-1.

Come the big day, will you be betting on the Grand National 2018 winner?

The Slowest Racehorse Ever!

We've all heard those positive cliches about the fastest racehorses in training. ''It's been catching pigeons on the gallops''

Sadly the converse can also be true where a horse makes a name for itself because it is decidedly sluggish. That's being polite to one or two who can only be described as horrendously slow. One horse to take this unflattering accolade is A Definite Diamond

Trained by Milton Bradley, pictured with The Tatling, who raced 176 times, won 18 races and achieved prize winnings of £687,000, retiring at the age of 14 when winning his final race at Wolverhampton is a stark contrast to this two-year-old filly. A Definite Diamond is a homebred daughter of Assertive, racing in the black and yellow silks of beleaguered owners Paul & Ann de Weck. 

The chestnut filly must have been struggling to catch snails at Sedbury, Gloucester. And definitely not a girl's best friend.

Racing over a variety of distances - from 5f to 1 mile - she has finished last in each of her six starts to date. She's been trounced by 54 horses, more than 200+ lengths.

In her most recent effort at Bath, over the minimum trip, she showed healthy pace only to tire at the two-furlong pole some 23 lengths behind her nearest rival. 

Sadly this March foal hasn't escaped her harshest critic on the racecourse - the official handicapper. 

The higher a horse's rating the better its ability. A horse rated 60 has to be considered poor. 

So what is the rating of A Definite Diamond? 

It doesn't look good. In fact, it is terribly low. Amazingly she has been given a rating of just 1.

Is she the slowest horse in racing?

Luckily her owners have tasted victory with 7 winners since 2003. The best of their horses named April Ciel, although he is trained by Ron Harris. 

Sometimes Diamonds aren't a girl's best friend.  

The Cheltenham Festival 2018: Too Much of a Good Thing?

Cheltenham Festival 2018
Regulars of the Cheltenham Festival will have grown used to, perhaps even sick of, the debate that occurs every year as to whether the festival represents too much of a good thing. In the last few years, the festival has expanded, going from a three-day event to a four day one. Some punters think that, in adding this extra day, organisers have had to fill the extra time with sub-par races.

The debate took a new turn this year when none other than James Knight, who occupies a senior position at the bookmakers Ladbrokes Coral, took to Twitter to vent his frustration. Knight referred to some of the festival's races as being “ridiculously hyped” and “done-to-death”. His remarks have divided punters and observers, but it seems that even those who might be inclined to agree with him won’t be put off from attending the festival.


Too Much of a Good Thing?

One of the most common arguments made in defence of the festival is that it draws in attendees who would not normally concern themselves with racing meets, thus helping to broaden the appeal of the sport. There is also a concern in some quarters that, were organisers to reverse the recent changes, the appeal of the festival would be limited and the corresponding drop in attendance could have significant ramifications for its future.
There is also the concern that if Cheltenham shrinks in size then many of the competing jump horses will be fielded at other events earlier in the year. Jump horses, like all animals, have a finite lifespan and the more they compete, the more chances there are for them to become injured, potentially ruling them out of appearing at Cheltenham when the time comes.


Other Races

From the beginning of November, the jump racing calendar enters its golden months. Every week, racing fans are treated to high-quality events. For example, there is the ever-popular Betfair Chase, the Tingle Creek, and the December Gold Cup, to name but a few.All of these events have proven to be popular and for many, they provide a useful indication of who to watch out for at Cheltenham.

As far as British flat racing goes, there is simply no equivalent to Cheltenham, as much as we wish there was, despite massive investment from the industry in trying to make this happen.


Bets and Tips

Of course, one of the main attractions of Cheltenham will always be the betting. The excitement of seeking out the best racing tips and the thrill when they pay off is an integral part of the experience. In amongst the punters who have devised their own proprietary system, there are also a number of keen observers, armed with an arsenal of statistics and observations from other race meets. And, of course, now that technology is playing an important role in the world of sports, and gambling, there are a number of websites who claim to offer the best bets and betting tips for Cheltenham Festival 2018.


The Cheltenham Festival remains one of the most popular events on the British jump race calendar. Its sustained popularity, as well as the inability of other sectors of the industry to replicate its success, suggests that it is an event that we should cherish while it is around.

The Concept of Value Betting

It is one of the oldest arguments in betting: are you better off looking for value or looking for winners?

To me, it is a no-brainer. Value is king. I am amazed anyone considers it a matter of debate, yet many do. Their thinking goes like this: what is the point of backing something because you think it is a big price if it has little or no chance of winning?

They will hold up as an example a football team that is playing away to the opposition that is generally accepted to be superior. Fulham against Manchester United at Old Trafford, for example. Fulham may be 12-1 but if you dare suggest that is too big a price, you are liable to be shot down in flames by those who believe that because the Cottagers are such big outsiders there is no point even contemplating whether or not they actually represent a value wager.

There is no point backing a string of big-value losers, they will reason. Refrain from getting embroiled in a debate with people who think this way. They are irrational and cannot possibly be winning punters in the long run. In betting, and in football, in particular, the value lies more often than not in the bigger-priced contenders. This is largely because of the average punter's fixation with the very shortest prices on the weekend football coupon.

Bookmakers can usually tell whether they will have a winning weekend simply by looking at the results of the top teams in the English Premiership and Scottish Premier League.

In the autumn of 2003, Arsenal, Chelsea, Manchester United, Celtic and Rangers all won on the same weekend eight times out of 11.

This caused a drop in bookmakers' profits as punters landed some significant accumulators. By the start of December, a blind £10 weekly five-timer on the quintet was showing a profit of £310. With their profits being dented, the layers reacted by strangling the match odds of the five teams that were hurting them.

Predictably, it did not prevent punters steaming into the so-called Big Five, even when they stopped winning so regularly. And with the hotpots shortening, their opponents were offered at even longer odds, leading to some decent paydays for those punters who took the rational view that the value lay with the long-shots.

The bottom line is that everything becomes good value if the price is right. You may head out of the house one day armed with £20,000 with the intention of buying a Mercedes. On the way to the showroom, you pass the Toyota dealership where the comparable car in their range is on offer at £14,000.

Your heart was set on the Merc but here is a car every bit as good for £6,000 less. You don't know why it is being offered so cheaply, but it is. You buy it and, whether you bank the six grand or use it to take the family to the Caribbean, you have made a value investment. So it is with betting. You intended to back Manchester United, but when you saw the prices and realised Fulham were so big, you backed them.

Many punters would, quite rightly, not dream of having a bet without searching for the best possible value, yet there are plenty who have no grasp of the concept of price-sensitivity and just back their fancies with the same bookmaker, be it on the phone, the net, or, more commonly, in the shop (internet punters tend to be more sophisticated and more aware of the basic premise that if you take the trouble to root out the best possible price you have a far greater chance of being successful over a long period).

Casino Players: Devil Vs Angel

Devil vs Angel
If a gambler had two tattoos - one on each shoulder - the pessimist would probably suggest a devil while the optimist would have their sights on an angel, both whispering words of wisdom. ''Keep that ace up your sleeve''. 

There are so many forms of gambling: horseracing, the stock market, lottery, casino... 

You name it.  The big question for many is where to bet. That's where Codeta Casino come into play. 

Assessing whether gambling is a good idea relates to one major factor: whether you are a winner or a loser. That point varies from one person to the next. Because even though many puritans suggest that gambling is an offensive word, there are many punters who make their betting pay. 

The first time I went to a casino made of bricks and mortar was at the Grosvenor Casino Great Yarmouth. To be honest, it was a brilliant evening. I managed to win a few quid in the process. I would recommend the experience to anyone. As long as you bet what you can afford to lose you will leave with a smile on your face and not losing your shirt. Far too chilly over this winter period to be half naked on the Norfolk Broads. 

However, joking aside, it's an opportunity to celebrate a special occasion. If you turn up on your birthday month, you'll get a free drink, a handful of free chips to bet and even a birthday cake if you ask nicely. 

The razzamatazz of traditional casino is all good and well but sometimes you just want to bet from the comfort of your home. That's where online casinos come into play. 

Take a look at Codeta Casino because it is a touch different from the avergae online experience. I've just looked and surprised.  

Codeta Casino Review:

Dealers:

Male and female dealers: young, attractive, dressed smartly.

Quote: ''All the dealers at Codeta live casino are good looking young men and women who appear to be in their 20s. 3 of the dealers were Eastern European, while Jake – the dealer for the London Roulette game – was a young English guy who sounded like he was perhaps from Essex. The background for the London Roulette game was very much like an upmarket European casino – ie the sort of thing you might expect to find in the Ritz in London.


The dress code is standard real-world casino, with each dealer, dressed appropriately for if they were in an upmarket casino in a hotel or on a cruise ship. Hands are well-manicured and certainly, there were no physical blemishes on display that could distract you from the gameplay.''

Dealer's Interactivity:

You will find the dealers personable and friendly.

Quote: ''As with many other online live casinos, you can hear other table games being played in the background – especially during the card games. This doesn’t put you off, though, and actually adds to the feeling that you’re taking part in a real-life casino scenario.''

Codeta Casino Technology:

Decent quality and speed of games. 

Codeta Casino Games:

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Bonus/Offer

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Red Rum: The Life of a Grand National Winner

Red Rum
It's a race that captures the attention of the world. 

The Grand National 2018 - April 14th, 2018, 5:15pm. The greatest National Hunt Steeplechase. 

Four and a half miles. Thirty jumps. Two circuits of blood, sweat, tears, sometimes sadness and joy. 

The history of this race details the ultimate three-time winner Red Rum who triumphed over adversity. His trainer, Ginger McCain, nurtured his favourite horse to prove that with love, care, hope and joy anything is possible. 

From galloping at Southport beach to winning the Grand National

Victorious in 1973, 1974 & 1977. 

Over the years, the Grand National has been a medium for many remarkable stories.

Here is a brief biography of the horse synonymous with the Grand National.

Red Rum

A champion thoroughbred steeplechaser. Grand National winner 1973, 1974 & 1977. Scottish Grand National victory in 1974. 

Like so many champions, Red Rum came from humble beginnings. 

This Irish-bred bay gelding was sired by Quorum out of a mare called Mared. Foaled 3rd May 1965 at Rosennara Stud in Kells, County Kilkenny. His breeder, Martyn McEnery, gave Red Rum his name (the last three letters of the mare and first three of the sire). 

A horse bred to win over one mile, few would have guessed in those early years, that he would be a champion over four and a half miles. 

Many readers may not realise that Red Rum started his racing career on the Flat. He dead-heated in his first race over 5f at Aintree, which then held Flat racing fixture whereas today it is National Hunt. 

He ran eight times at two. A juvenile winner over 7f at Warwick alongside his victory at Aintree, and Doncaster at three in one of two races that season. 

Did you know? He was twice ridden by Lester Piggott and his stable lad was none other than comedian Lee Mack!

However, for all his early achievements, the best was yet to come when purchased by Ginger McCain for his new owner Noel le Mare for 6000 guineas. Two days later Red Rum was found to be lame. However, this didn't cut short the determination of man nor horse. McCain remembered seeing how sea-water helped rejuvenate old carthorses. This daily gallop helped Red Rum to be fit and ready for the greatest test of his life: The Grand National. 

In many ways, the rest is history. 

In 1973 he made his debut in the National beating the outstanding Australian chaser, Crisp who carried 23 pounds more. In truth, Crisp was one of the most astounding chasers in history. After being 30 lengths clear at the last fence, he tired and Red Rum won in a remarkable race. 

Red Rum retained his title in 1974. A year which saw him win the Scottish Grand National. The only horse to win both National in the same year!

1975 & 1976 saw him finish runner-up.  


The following year, Red Rum, now twelve, won for a remarkable third time. A historic moment never matched. 

While being prepared for his sixth National, he suffered a hairline fracture the day before the big day and retired. 

This equine celebrity didn't let the grass grow under his feet annually leading the Grand National parade. He opened supermarkets, adorned all manner of merchandising. 

Red Rum passed away on 18th October 1995 aged 30. His death made headline news across the world. 

Red Rum was buried at the finishing post of his beloved Aintree. The place of his first and last win. 

A three-time Champion of the Grand National. 

Pro Gambler Favourite Bets


There is one thing all pro gamblers have in common: they want to win money from bookmakers. However, from there many have conflicting ideas of what makes a good bet. See what these three yesteryear to modern-day professional gamblers had to say on this fascinating subject. What bet made them tick? Learn the secrets from the likes of Jack Ramsden, Alex Bird & Harry Findlay.    


MULTIPLE BETS
Jack Ramsden quit his job as a stockbroker in 1980 and made a name for himself as professional punter. His successful punting like so many other professionals was based around speed figures and race times.

Ramsden's advice on each way bets is to ditch them. He states: I analysed my betting a couple of years ago and found that if I had doubled my win stakes instead of having each way bets, I would have been much better off. I think all punters would benefit by cutting out all each-way bets and sticking to singles.

He was unusual in that he used his own bookmaker, Colin Webster. There relationship was indeed unique, Colin paid Ramsden £5,000 a year for his advice and also had the job of getting his bets on with other bookmakers. Another unusual trait of Jack Ramsden wass his liking for the multiple bet. His reasoning was that they are an extension of his policy to go for large prices and he reckoned that on 4 occasions he won over £200,000 on multiple bets.

PHOTOGRAPGH
Alex Bird was the original professional gambler who made a fortune after the war at Britain's racecourses. He learned his trade working for his father who was a bookmaker but soon decided that it would be more profitable to be on the other side. He had many different ways of beating the bookmaker, but probably his most famous was his success on betting on the result of photo finishes. Unlike today photo finishes would take about 5 minutes to develop so there was always an active betting market on the outcome. Bird very early on noticed that when horses crossed the line together an optical illusion meant that the horse on the far side invariably looked like he had won. He also discovered a simple technique which meant the illusion didn't occur. He stood at an elevated vantage point as near to the winning post as possible, he would keep very still, close his left eye and create an imaginary line across the track at the finishing line. He used this simple system for the next 20 years to make himself a fortune. With a reported 500 consecutive successful bets.

Another favoured method he used to make money was to use his influence in the ring to create a false favourite. He often placed huge bets often as much as £50K at a time however he couldn't get these sort of bets laid in the betting ring so he would employ an army of helpers around the country placing bets in off-course bookmakers. If Bird fancied a horse but felt the odds were to short he would place a bet of up to £10K on another horse in the race. He would then ensure that it was "leaked" that he had placed the bet. Prices would then dramatically alter as the "mug" money poured onto his horse. This meant that the price of the horse that he wanted to back heavily and clandestinely off the course would drift out in the market. His army of helpers would then back the horse off course all over the country.

These are Alex Birds Golden Betting Rules:

1. Never bet when there is a change in the going. There is nothing to upset form quite as much as a change in the going.

2. Be aware of the overrounds being offered by bookmakers and don't bet when they are unfair. At some smaller meetings bookmakers will sometimes create a book 40% or 50% in their favour.

3. Be an Each-Way thief. Do this by finding races with 8-10 runners which are not handicaps, and where there are only a few form horses in the race. Then oppose the favourite and combine the second and third favourites in each-way combination bets.

4. Look for up and coming apprentices. A good apprentice with a 7lb claim can be worth his weight in gold!

5. Never bet on the first show, you will find that the majority of runners increase in price. Taking second show prices will increase your winnings by 10% over a season.

6. Never bet in handicaps.

7. Never bet in 3year old maidens, particularly those only for fillies.



Harry Findlay, a flamboyant and highly successful gambler, gives the impression that he can hardly believe his luck in owning a horse as good as Denman, arguably one of the most talented novice chaser in its time. He said: "Denman had got that sort of thing about him, people either want to take him on or they like him, and that's the sort of person I am. There was no middle, grey area with Denman, there's no grey area with me. That's my type of character."

On gambling

"If you look up gambling in the dictionary, it doesn't say 'this means a sure way to make a steady profit over a period of time', it says 'gambling: a form of interest that can either ruin you or make you a fortune', and that's the way it is."

On Horse Race Betting he said: "There's no difference between getting 1-2 about a 1-4 chance and getting 4-1 about a 2-1 chance. People who say 'I won't bet odds-on', they're just idiots. When you want to bet an odds-on shot, you can get on - when you want to bet a big-priced one, you can't."

On why you shouldn't hedge

"When you pick a 20-1 shot to win the Grand National, don't have £200 at 20's and then go and lay £600 at 5-2 and, when it wins, get £2,500. If you believe that 20-1 shot, have £200 at 20's and then go and have another £300 at 14's and then £400 at 10's and then, when it goes off 5-2 or 11-4, don't hedge if you still fancy it."




Profitable Sports Gambling Begins With Discipline

An article I found from Ross Everett a freelance sports writer and respected authority on sports betting odds comparison. His writing has appeared on a variety of sports sites including sports news and World Cup betting sites. He lives in Southern Nevada with three Jack Russell Terriers and a kangaroo. He is currently working on an autobiography of former energy secretary Donald Hodell.


I get some of my best sports gambling concepts from non-sports gambling books. That’s not really surprising, since there are so few serious works addressing sports handicapping and gambling. Of all the various gambling related disciplines, sports gambling is perhaps the most complex. The paucity of written work on the subject is downright shameful in light of that fact. Since there’s so little specific literature available some of the best theoretical resources available to the serious sports gambler can be found in books written for the serious poker player.


Poker literature is especially applicable to the sports handicapper because both can be very profitable for a knowledgeable, experienced and skillful pro. Poker expert Bob Caro has noted that while there are a number of professional gamblers specializing in poker and sports wagering there’s not a single person who can honestly say they play roulette for a living.

The simple fact is that the house edge in roulette cannot be overcome by any combination of skill, experience and/or discipline. When you win, it is because you get lucky. When you lose, its because you didnt get lucky. To add another Caro concept to the equation, the decisions that the player makes when playing roulette simply dont matter”at least in terms of overcoming the theoretical edge enjoyed by the house. In the long term, it doesnt matter whether you choose red or black, odd or even, or certain numbers. You may get lucky with your choices or you may not, but these decisions do not impact the house edge one iota.

Caro stresses the paramount importance of discipline to a poker player’s long term success and profitability. It’s important to keep in mind that to succeed as a professional gambler that you need to approach a trip to the casino with a diametrically opposite mindset to that of the recreational gambler. A recreational gambler heads to the casino to *avoid* discipline and ‘unwind’. The professional uses discipline to his advantage.

Caro’s emphasis on discipline in poker is also true for the serious sports gambler. The foundation of a professional sports bettor’s long term success is to approach it with the same discipline, rigor and professionalism that he would any other job. If you continue to think about it in the same terms as the recreational gambler does, you’re in for a difficult road. The more seriousness that you bring to your sports betting, the higher the likelihood that you’ll be successful.

There’s nothing wrong with being a recreational sports gambler, or a recreational gambler of any sort. They’re vital to those of us who do this for a living since they’re what keeps casinos and sportsbooks in business. Ultimately, the best handicapping is pointless without a sportsbook to take the action.

If your goal is to bet recreationally, that’s great. Unless you have the dedication, desire and discipline to approach it at a profession a recreational approach to gambling is ultimately better for most people. You might benefit from some greater money management discipline, but at the end of the day as long as you don’t bet more than you can afford to lose it’s really no big deal.

Tips on making a profitable career from horse race betting

Win At The Races
Wouldn’t it be nice if you could follow your passion of only watching horses race and placing bets? After all, doing what you love is one of the secrets to a happy life.

Contrary to what most non-gamblers think, betting on horses is hard work. There’s the strain of the constant emotional ups and downs of victories and losses. There’s the nerve-wracking decision making process of which horse to back and how much to place on a bet, and much more. But what are the chances of turning this into a full-time job that’ll finance your mortgage and send your kids to college? With races such as the Kentucky Derby, and the 2017 Breeders Cup coming up perhaps you're tempted to try and follow suit.
Well the short and brutal answer is your chances are very low. Why? Because horses like people are very unpredictable and the likelihood of you winning as many bets as you need to remain financially stable is dependent far too much on the mercies of Lady Luck.
The most successful bettors and handicappers all support their passion for the races with a day job that pays the bills and provides them something to fall back on when things aren’t going too well on the track.


But there’s still hope

While I did say the chances of being a fulltime bettor were low, I didn’t say they were non-existent. If you insist on following your dream, below are just some of the things it would take to make a steady and dependable living from playing the races.
  • Finances
Well you can’t be a gambling man or woman if you don’t have the bankroll to finance your passion. The key to successfully gambling and not falling into debt is ensuring what you put into bets never exceeds what you currently have. But if you keep putting money into the races without winning, you’ll eventually be left penniless. Plenty pro gamblers often don’t earn profits of greater than 10% of what they’ve invested in races. Will that be enough to sustain you especially after you factor in your general life expenses?
  • Solid Handicapping
Handicapping is important because it points you in the direction of horses that are more likely to win. You could pay for handicapping services from a pro to help you place better bets, just make sure it’s giving you winning horses
  • Confidence and self-discipline
It’s very important you don’t let your emotions get the best of you while you are at the track. If you have a plan, stick with it and avoid being lured into playing with your prime bankroll at a race you have no genuine certainty on.
  • Money Management
There really isn’t one perfect way to manage your finances if you opt for gambling as your chosen line of profession, but you could try out the Kelly Criterion. This involves optimizing wager size on the perceived edge on a race based on fair odds assigned to your pick against the track odds.
Other management options you could pursue are the Percentage of Bankroll, and Fixed Wager Size.
  • Learn from your mistakes
There are rules to winning when betting but none of the rules are set in stone. If you try something today and it works, it doesn’t mean it’s going to work again tomorrow. So be prepared to be constantly learning and avoid making the same mistakes twice. This will save you from less regret and keep you ahead.
  • Hedging
If you are good at trifectas and exactas then hedging bets with a win bet can help you break even when other bets don’t work out like you expected.
  • Varying Exotic Wagers
Vary the amount staked in exotics depending on your expected payoffs. By doing this, you’ll be hedging your wagers for in case the favourites come in and make room for a reduced but profitable wager on longer shots.


Conclusion


Keep in mind that every successful gambler has their own winning formula which they update from time to time. If you have your own way of betting that works out perfectly for you and you are disciplined and smart with your money, I suppose you could head over to the Kentucky Derby and many more races to make a living. But just to be safe, don’t get too excited and quit your day job just yet.

How Do You Win at Slots?

Playing Slots - How To Win
Ask a casino owner where they make most of their revenue and you will hear them say: ''Slots'' In fact, most casinos make about 70% of their money from those technological one-armed bandits. 

True the arm has gone to be replaced by a button but basically, punters can't get enough of online slots. 

Take a look at Casumo's welcome bonus to get 200% up to £50 + £20 free spins.  

For all you slot players out there, you may have one question to ask.

How do you win at slots?

What strategy should your everyday punter use?

Is it possible to make a living from playing slots? To be fair, I haven't met anyone who makes a living but that doesn't mean to say people don't make betting on slots pay. 

Take a look at these secrets:

1# Bankroll management

It's an old adage, but bet what you can afford to lose. If betting £100, then you are wise to bet at a lower level unless you really want to chance your luck with high-priced spins. Basically, bet to your budget.

2# Connect play lines to... costs 

Whether playing live or online, play lines matter. 

Take  a look at what this expert had to say on the subject: 

''A common mistake slots beginners make is to consider pay lines relevant only when it gets on how to build a winning spin and calculate a number of coins won, while where pay lines matter the most – again – is the calculation of your slot machine’s actual cost. 


True, if you sit at a 25 pay lines slot and you bet only on 5 of them you can simply forget to hit one of those absurdly large payouts and see a six-figures jackpot coming to fatten your bankroll.

But try not to forget our first slots tip, as betting on all the 25 lines of trying to hit the jackpot will cost you considerably more than just going for a handful of those aiming to a more modest win. So, once again, what does your balance say? Can you really afford all those bets at once? ''


3# Don't be a slot player stalker

This isn't going to happen in your living room. However, if you go to a brick-and-mortar casino you will notice a lot of gamblers are playing. Like they have some kind of formula which means they win while you are like some newbie finding your feet. 

In actual fact, they are looking for what they term ''hot'' or ''cold'' slots. The hot slots being ones that haven't paid pay for a considerable amount of time, while the cold being those which have given someone a bundle of love (cash). 

Here's the thing you need to know. 


It's a lie

Modern-day slots don't work like that. It's all very random. If they pay out big, it doesn't mean the next spin will not go one better.   

4# Go for the maximum bet 

When you have loaded your slot with money you have to make a choice: 

The amount of money you will play on each bet. 

The point being that betting £1 four times is the same as one £4 bet. Although costing the same in total, they have different consequences. 

Our expert quote: 

''That is because online slots generally offer identical payouts whether you bet 1, 2 or more coins – changing only the multiplier you will have to multiply your winning by. Bet one coin and you will multiply your winning by 1x; bet two coins and the multiplier will be 2x; three coins and you will go for 3x and so on.''

Good luck.