Sunday, 8 July 2018

The Opportunities of a Professional Gambler: Eddy Murray

Professional gambler stories One year as a Professional Gambler 2004-2005

This is a post from Eddy Murray:

This was my original post on the Betfair forum about my first year as a professional gambler.  This article led Inside Edge magazine to get in touch with me, and my work for both Inside Edge magazine and The Sportsman newspaper stemmed from it.

The first week of March last year I left work to go full time, and one year on, I'd like to put this thread up as perhaps some people may find it helpful.


Being a gambler is not something I ever expected to become. The advent of the internet, and the exchanges, have changed my life (for now) dramatically. I still can't quite believe its been just twelve months, but I for one have a lot to thank Andrew Black and Ed Wray for.

The twelve months started fairly badly after nearly being killed in a car crash in Puerto Del Carmen, Lanzarote. That was a bit of a disappointment. However, on return to the UK, I had two or three very successful months, until suddenly I was hit by a double whammy. I had originally been winning on three different types of market, and suddenly overnight became a big loser on two of them. At the same time I had been guilty of expanding my own lifestyle and expectations (in a very human, but perhaps unwise way), and had also spent a third of my bank buying (music) recording studio equipment – the one thing which I'd always dreamed of having.

Losing half of my remaining bank in the space of a fortnight last June left me in deep trouble, and it looked like I was in danger of having made a massive mistake. There was one point where I had one final bet (not a huge one though) where I promised myself if it lost to stop and never bet ever again. It did end up winning. I asked Gamcare for advice, who were very helpful. When gambling messes up your sleeping, as well as your waking hours, it is a crushing realisation that you are in a mess.

There are no evening classes, A-levels, or MBAs in gambling. There are a small band of hardcore professional gamblers, nearly all of them at least partially on Betfair, who are literally some of the sharpest minds there are. Any amounts on any market above £100 are likely to be bets placed up there by one of them. They are equally as talented at gambling as a top barrister or doctor would be at their trade. Nobody walks into a courtroom and decides to be a top lawyer for the day, nor operate in theatre at the local hospital. The difference with betting is that everyone can (and most do) have a bet. What can be much simpler than having £10 on Manchester United to win a football match?

Last June (only three months after leaving work), I was in fairly heavy trouble. I had a certain level of my bank which I had set as a level I would try to never go below. When it reached that level, it looked like taking the gamble on becoming a gambler was one I was on the brink of losing.

At that point, the advice I received from another gambler changed everything. I was in contact with a number of people, mainly originally through Betfair's forum, but one of them I hold my hat off to, and have an enormous gratitude to, and respect for (you know who you are guv'nor). I managed to cross over and adapt my skills across a wide range of markets/sports, so that I had degrees of success in new areas. A key part of remaining a pro is the ability to adapt to a constantly changing market. You literally have to run to stand still to be successful in as fiercely competitive an environment as Betfair.

Winning money through betting is paradoxically something I feel very uncomfortable with morally. Are there people on the other side of these bets who are risking more than they can afford to lose? All the money originally deposited into Betfair has at some stage been earned in an office, a factory, a checkout, forecourt or salon. Much of it has real blood sweat and tears behind it. It makes me incredibly sad to read the figures from the big 3 that they have around 200,000 customers a year losing an average of £3,000 a year into FOBT's, as reported on a number of threads on the General Betting forum. One of my ex-girlfriends had only come to England with her mother many years ago, after her father's gambling addiction took their family to financial and emotional ruin, and her parents separated. There are real human beings out there who become just further statistics to fall by the wayside in the current pro-gambling British culture.

There's always the hope that if you do win, it's off a rich city trader, who is punting silly money for fun. Betfair has a very small number of seriously big winners (of which I am not one), but very few if any big losers. It has a vast legion of small losers. A football match can be more fun with a bet having been placed on it. The people who gamble for entertainment (whether they win or lose), as an enjoyable hobby to complement an already balanced life are perhaps the real winners. Given to this group of its customers, it is the better value and accessibility to a product they enjoy, that is perhaps Betfair's greatest success.

For every 100 winners in a calendar year, many of them will fall by the wayside the following year. One of the most famous posts on this forum has been 'The Story of Ster', who went from being a big winner to someone whose methods became horribly outmoded, and he found himself deceiving his family about his gambling problems. According to his last post he found happiness and support from his loved ones. For every passage of time, past present and future, there will be a number who are crushed through indiscipline/addiction/chasing/recklessness and/or greed.

A year full time feels like a lifetime. Gambling is neither a hobby nor a job, it is a lifestyle. One thread on here has had a user called TETO setting a target of £50 a day, whilst another has a user called 'Doubled' seeking to make £25,000 a year. Everyone starts gambling with £1's and £2's, and if they are good, that progresses to fivers, tenners, fifties, and then hundreds. There are people who bet tens of thousands of pounds per football match, horse or rugby team on Betfair, without blinking an eyelid. If you have two gamblers, one of them 5% better than the other, one could realistically make £20,000 a year from it, the second one could make £70,000. The difference between earning £26,000 a year in the workplace, and £32,000 a year could be four or five years' hard graft and promotion. A small difference in gambling skill can make an astronomical difference to the bottom line here though. The real shrewdies who use Betfair make about 10% profit on turnover, with a fairly astonishing turnover level by any layman's standards.

There is no security in the future of any gambler, bar their own ability to stash away whatever they can for a rainy day. I am 26, and I know that when I do go back into the workplace (something I hope to do) it will be at the bottom rung again. Each year spent as a full timer doesn't knock off a year of your real career at the bottom end of the ladder, it knocks off one of the best years at the end of it. It is quite a heavy burden for me, when most of my peers are doing well and forging ahead as consultants/analysts/bankers/lawyers/accountants/actuaries. Only hindsight will let me know if I did actually make the right decision at this stage in my life.

I'd like to put forward my own opinions of the kind of people who I think would make successful pro gamblers. Every school boy wants to be captain of the football team, or seeing the prettiest girl in the school. I was neither, just a quiet studious swot who probably annoyed people by continually beating everyone in the exams, as well as probably other various nerdy and equally nefarious activities. Pets don't win prizes, geeks do. If you can remember the class genius/nerd, I don't think you're cut out to be a winner on Betfair. If you were the nerd, you have a chance. As I said before, nobody expects to turn up and be a brilliant doctor or lawyer, but everybody likes to have a punt, and most are happy to bet until they've done their cobblers.

I've personally written two specific programs/models which have proved invaluable on certain markets. One has half a million variables. The other I'm incredibly proud of, and wouldn't sell for 30k. Winning at gambling is extraordinarily hard to do consistently, and it takes an armoury of graft, skill and discipline to succeed. The technical skill and wizardry behind some of the API programming is itself several steps up from a relatively small fish like me.

Nobody is ever a real winner from gambling until the day they cash in their chips, and leave the casino. There are gamblers throughout history who have won millions, and lost it all back. If somebody asked me if it can be done, could I truthfully say 'yes'? I'm not sure that I could. I could easily be one of the hundred pros who whilst being successful for the last year, may fall by the wayside over the next. There is no tragedy in that – all that a man can ask for in life is the freedom to live by the sword, and you can only do that if it's possible to die by the sword if you fail.

Starting out as a full timer is not something I would recommend to almost any other person (out of a sense of moral responsibility, not attempted protection of an imaginary part of some imaginary pot of gold). It has been the most astonishing learning curve, and in my first few months I experienced both sustained exhilaration and sustained depression. Gambling success is a fickle mistress, with incredible runs of both victories and defeats entwined illogically by fate. Value is all-important – not winners. That's the first lesson to any gambler, and one which the majority don't ever start to comprehend. The secret is not getting more heads than tails, its winning more when a coin comes up heads than you lose when it's tails.

To be a real pro, gambling ends up becoming almost like a form of accountancy, with a good staking plan, and calculation of value as and when it arises. I no longer have any thrill whatsoever from winning or losing a bet.

It has been an amazing twelve months, and I am very fortunate to have been successful for now. I'm sorry if some of this thread comes across as arrogant – it's all genuine from this side. Some people reading this will be thinking about going pro, and I'm sure other people will be reading too. If you do go pro, then try to remember how much of a rollercoaster emotionally it can be especially at first. Have a level of your bank which you will not go below, and promise yourself you won't go below it. Then make sure you keep that promise. If I've learnt anything its how unimportant money is, and how precious the people around you are.

I hope some of this helps other people. There'll be another geek out there like me who is at the stage I was at a year ago. I hope everyone finds fulfilment and happiness, which is much more than gambling in itself will ever have to offer.

Eddy Murray , Spring 2005

http://www.eddymurray.com/

Sunday, 1 July 2018

Becoming a Professional Gambler

I found this article on Slipperytoad website, originally published by Punt.Com blog, and it makes fascinating if not a little pessimistic reading.

Forums, blogs, bookies and betting websites are full of people dreaming of becoming professional gamblers. Being your own boss, working when you feel like it, making loads of money and watching sports for a living is certainly appealing to most people. Let this post (and the rest of this blog) be a reality check.


I see a lot of people giving up jobs to do this after a short time trading. They think it’s easy and straight forward, they think it will last forever… They haven’t thought it through.


Free Horse Racing Tips, Click Here!
I’ve been a professional gambler now for over 3 1/2 years. Before that I gambled for 2 years before I took the decision to do it. It was the biggest decision of my life, certainly not one I took lightly. Giving up a guaranteed income and job prospects to gamble with my own money was extremely risky to say the least.

When you give up your job, you’re not only going to be risking your money gambling, but your entire future job prospects. Let me tell you, gamblers are not viewed in the same way as someone who works in a normal job. Compare the reaction you get when you tell someone you are a gambler to when you tell them you work in a bank. Even if you compare it to being a “day trader”, the reaction is a mixture of contempt, fascination and disbelief.


Most people will flatly not believe you. Gamblers are the vagrants of society. The losers that hang around bookies, wasting their family income on an addiction. No one believes it is possible to win, and if you have – it’s just luck. Like it or not, this is how you will be viewed. Some will feel sorry for you, others will not give you the time of day. You are going to be one of society’s outsiders.


Family relationships can be strained and tested. It takes a lot of understanding from family and friends and this can weigh on your mind whilst you are gambling. A stable family life is important, it spills over into your work – few jobs are affected as much by this. You need stability and space to work well. And vice versa, a bad day at the office should not affect the way you treat those closest to you, can you really say that you won’t be in a terrible mood when you lose £xxxxx on some tennis player that gave up?


Your financial future is now uncertain. You are no longer contributing to society, you are not paying tax – an advantage to the gambler sure, but it doesn’t improve your self esteem and further enhances the feeling of being an outsider.


Try to borrow money from the bank? It’s easier said than done. This is why you need to try to secure your future financially as far in advance as you can before you make it your sole income


What about future job prospects? If you need to work again, do you really think future employers are going to be happy with you spending a year or two gambling for a living when they read your cv.


How much have you won before you turn pro? It’s hardly ever enough. You need to make many times your current income before you do it. Make sure you have savings that are stashed away, preferably making you a reasonable amount of interest. I might have turned professional a year before I did, but I had to make sure I was safe financially before I did so. Not only for my lively hood, but so that I could work confidently and without pressure. You cannot perform in this game if you are too worried about losing your hard earned cash. Pressure on your profit and loss is deadly.


What about when you do take the plunge, your day to day life is going to change dramatically in ways you may not have imagined. Interaction with other people becomes scarce. You will be spending long periods of time alone, clicking away staring at a screen all day. The temptation to live up to the stereotype is obvious. Why bother making an effort when you can get up, do some work and go back to bed again.. Discipline. Working alone throws up serious challenges. Your health and fitness can suffer drastically. The way you interact with other people can take a tumble. Prepare for this in advance.


It’s not all excitement and glamour. It can be downright boring doing the same things day in day out. Boredom for some gamblers can be their most dangerous adversary. You can end up working on things you don’t need to be. Betting too much and over trading for the sake of it.


Gambling certainly doesn’t owe you a living. A normal job pays you for turning up, no one’s going to do that here – they are going to try to take money off you for turning up. It’s you against a world of other people, all of whom have opinions, some of them most definitely better informed than you. Just how professional are you when it comes to the crunch, are you certain you are at the top of the tree? How consistent is your performance going to be to combat everyone else and stay ahead of the game. There are some brilliant brains out there trying to beat you at every turn – be wise to the available strategies and the people you are up against and give them respect – it’s your money and therefore livelihood they are after.


There are very few real professional gamblers, the reasons above outline why. It’s incredibly tough to do. You are going to be tested mentally every day and you will need to guard against developing bad psychological habits. There are reasons why gambling can cause problems for most people. There is a fine line between problem gambling, pathological gambling and professional gambling. Many professionals develop problems, be aware of the risks. Here’s a site about different types of gamblers. It suggests there are fewer than 50 gamblers in the US that make over $100,000 a year. With all the negative problems you can face as a professional gambler, you better make sure you are being compensated. Ask yourself what a fair amount is for enduring these problems, if you aren’t already making that then is it really worthwhile.


Think about your life situation and your family life. You are risking your money and theirs. I was fortunate when I began that I was young, single and in a job that didn’t pay that much and I was able to spend as much time as I liked pursuing it, without overheads and relationship damaging consequences. It’s extraordinarily time consuming to begin with, especially as you are going to have to work hard to increase from little to a sum of money suitable to work from. Don’t underestimate the time this takes, and the time you will be spending away from family chasing something that might not even work out.


I know this post is quite pessimistic. I think it’s supposed to be. I’ve heard it said before that professional gamblers are pessimists, I’m not sure I agree completely, but in this post I certainly think it’s a good idea to be. No matter how much you think you are ready, wait a while longer. Wait until you are sure you aren’t just lucky, then wait some more… Know why you aren’t plain lucky, and be big enough to admit defeat if you have been.

Tuesday, 19 June 2018

Professional Gamblers: Jack Ramsden

OK, YOU GO FIRST...
Jack Ramsden quit his job as a stockbroker in 1980 and since then has had 13 consecutive winning years as a professional punter. His successful punting like so many other professional punters is based around speed figures and race times.

He recently stated I cannot stress too strongly the importance of race times. They bind my whole approach together. There are fewer good times recorded over jumps but everyone seems to know about those horses and they are too short to back. Join our professional gambler newsletter by clicking here



Even cutting out the endless looking up of form books, I still spend two or three hours every day working out my bets. Jack continues, I'm constantly on the look out for the 3/1 chance that starts at 8/1. There are 30 or 40 of them a year and they are there to be seen. At those prices, you don't have to be right all the time! His premise is that while a good horse is capable of doing a bad time, no bad horse is capable of doing a good time.


He is unusual in that he has his own bookmaker, Colin Webster. There relationship is indeed unique, Colin pays Ramsden £5,000 a year for his advice and also has the job of getting his bets on with other bookmakers. Another unusual trait of Jack Ramsden is his liking for the multiple bets. His reasoning is that they are an extension of his policy to go for large prices and he reckons that on 4 occasions he has won over £200,000 on multiple bets.


Another piece of advice from Ramsden is regarding each-way bets. His advice is to ditch them. He states: I analysed my betting a couple of years ago and found that if I had doubled my win stakes instead of having each way bets, I would have been much better off. I think all punters would benefit by cutting out all each-way bets and sticking to singles.





Jack met his wife Lynda Ramsden when she worked at the Epsom yard of John Sutcliffe Snr, where Jack, one of Barry Hills's first owners, had horses. Ramsden was working in the City, but the City wasn't working for him. "I was a pretty useless stockbroker," he admitted. The Couple married in 1977 and then started training racehorses in the Isle of Man. I few years later moving over to England and North Yorkshire where they  trained for many years.


More pro gambler tales:


Dave Nevison

Phill Bull
A Tale Of A Pro Gambler

Tuesday, 12 June 2018

Hard Times Gambling Tips to Make Money

As the economy worsens and many people find themselves in a downward financial spiral, many will consider trying to win money to solve their economic problems. I've owned and raced horses, handicapped horse races for profit, and counted cards at the blackjack tables in casinos. I've made money at those things, but never got rich and found it to be more work than a regular job. It isn't glamorous or sexy to sit at a blackjack table for hours with drunks trying to tell you how to play your cards and the pit boss eyeing you suspiciously.

There is also nothing fun about walking out of a race track with empty pockets. The truth of the matter is that if you are one of the consumers of gambling, that is, not the casino owner or owner of the race track, then the game is against you from the get go. Don't get me wrong, I'm not about to quit playing, but I hate to see people risking what little they have trying to get lucky.

If you really want to get lucky, work for the casino or at the race track. I've never worked for a casino but have worked at a race track and I got paid every day no matter who won the race. If none of this has discouraged you or convinced you to quit, here is a little advice that might help.

First and foremost, set limits and know when to quit, especially when you're ahead. At some time in their visit to the casino, almost every gambler has a time when he or she is ahead and yet, most leave a loser. How do you know when to quit? Gambling, like most things in life, is streaky, or cyclical. You will have times when you win a few bets at the horses or hit a jackpot at the slots or a big pot at the poker table.

Nine out of ten gamblers proceed to keep betting and playing and give it all back. The longer you play the more likely you are to lose due to something called churn. Casinos and race tracks love churn. It simply means that each time you bet, the house or track gets a piece of your bet. It may only be a few percentage points in the casino or 20% at the track, but it adds up.

One of the few successful gamblers that I know is a lady who plays trifectas at the horse races. She is one of the cheapest people I know, but she still takes $60 per week and plays the ponies. If she loses it, she goes home and waits until the next week. When she wins, and she does, she usually hits trifectas that pay well. She will take the money and put it in the bank and use it to pay her bills or buy things she couldn't usually afford.

The next week, no matter how much is in the bank account, she only takes $60 and goes back to the track. She loves to handicap and doesn't look at it as the only source of her income. She knows that if she loses, she hasn't lost everything. In other words, there is no big pressure on her to win. She simply does her best to pick good trifecta combinations and then she plays them.

Over the years she has spent quite a bit of money on good books about handicapping and money management, which brings up another important point. Invest in yourself first. An investment in good information that you can use or a good education is the best investment most of us can make. She doesn't gamble with scared money and can stay within her limits.

So when you get hot and find yourself ahead, be realistic and quit. Take whatever you have and call it a day. The race track or casino will be there next week. Use most of the money to pay down that credit card or mortgage and just save enough for your next trip to the track or casino. You will be amazed, if you follow this simple gambling advice at how you cut your losses and maximize your profits.

Author: Bill Peterson



Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/online-gambling-articles/hard-times-gambling-tips-to-make-money-4131887.html
About the Author

If you want to learn how a horse owner and insider handicaps just go to http://williewins.homestead.com/truecb.html and get the truth. Bill Peterson is a former horse race owner and professional handicapper. To see all Bill's horse racing material go to Horse Racing Handicapping, Bill's handicapping store.

Wednesday, 30 May 2018

6:35 Ripon 2yo Racing Tips (30th May)

Horse racing tips
An EBF Novice Stakes race over 5f on good to firm going. Seven two-year-olds take part: five with racecourse experience and two debutantes from leading trainers.

Rockin Roy proved an easy winner on debut at Beverley when ''kept on strongly'' to beat The Great Heir who won next start when favourite. Archie Watson has done well with his juveniles this season (as he did last). This Irish-bred son of Fast Company looks a sharp breeze-up purchase at £36,000. He has to shoulder a 4lb win penalty for that first victory. By race type, this is a step up in class, which makes life a little harder. In fairness, he won well on debut. I wouldn't be in a rush to bet even money simply because one or two horses may improve. 

One horse who has plenty of pace but fails to get home is Gingersdunthelot. David Loughnane's charge started in the Brocklesby Stakes and outpaced in the Lily Agnes at Chester. Those races take some winning and he will find this a touch easier. However, he is very unlikely to figure here unless a few of these disappoint.  

Ann Duffield has been quiet with her juveniles this year. In fact, just looking at our database this is her first two-year-old to hit the track for 2018. The bookies have Miss Sabina priced 25/1. This daughter of Mayson cost £16,000 at the yearling sales. She wears a hood for this racecourse bow which is a negative. Also, she is the only filly in this line up. This local course for the stable is an ideal starting point. Duffield can win at big prices so not impossible although unlikely. 

Smile A Mile represents Mark Johnston's stable. They have been in excellent form - firing in winners - and this son of Slade Power was probably expected to shine on debut at Newcastle when an odds-on shot (8/11f). Clearly, connections must have been expecting something special. However, they we met with a dismal display when trailing home seventh. Over a month off course, there may have been an issue on debut. The betting should indicate this horse's ability. If strongly fancied it would bring further encouragement. 

Another trainer who doesn't lack for talented two-year-olds is Richard Fahey. A real wizard at getting his juveniles primed for their debut although some do need the run or simply lack ability. Silver Dust is a son of Clodovil and 57,000G yearling purchase. One to note. 

To add to the mix we have Life Of Riley and Mark's Choice who ran in the same race on debut at Hamilton. 

The former is trained by Karl Burke in the ownership of Ontoawinner syndicate. Both need little introduction to talented horses. Life Of Riley was relatively fancied on his racecourse bow. I think when these owners run a debutante at the course it speaks well of their regard. This son of Showcasing wasn't beaten far into fifth place. However, he may have ruined his chance by being much too keen. He was pulling for a couple of furlongs which must have taken the sting out of his tail in the final furlong. It wouldn't be a surprise to see this horse backed. If fancied in the betting, I can see a marked improvement. If weak, it would be a negative. 

Ruth Carr's colt, Mark's Choice, was one place ahead in fourth. He has show promise on both starts and not without a chance here. He was far too keen on debut at Doncaster. However, he was the polar opposite at Hamilton. I couldn't work out whether it was a bad ride or if the horse had his head in the clouds. He was so slow into stride and taking his time running off the pace. There seemed to be no urgency from man nor horse. He moved up with real purpose and drew level with the leaders before tiring in the closing stages. In many ways, it was a decent run because he must have traveled at some pace to even get competitive. It was a strange run. If starting on terms - and staying with the pack - you have to think this colt has some claim.   

Conclusion: An intriguing race. A small field of just seven horse which is a shame for each-way backers. Quite a few of these hold some claims. The favourite could be a talent but has to shoulder the win penalty. This is a step up in class and if one or two of these are improvers, I wouldn't want to be betting levels you devils. Smile A Mile is possibly a fair-class horse. The betting had to be significant on debut. There could have been an issue. If this horse is backed to short odds I would be convinced it has ability. If weak, if is best watched.  Silver Dust could go well for Richard Fahey. Life Of Riley and Mark's Choice definitely catch my eye. I have a feeling Burke's horse could be backed. If fancied in the betting has sound each-way claims. Mark's Choice is a funny one to weigh up. He has something but would want to be off the pace like last time. I would hope this horse drifts to big odds and may be worth a small each-way bet. On balance, this looks a tough race to find a winner because there could be four or five with a fighting chance if things go right. I would have to take a watching brief. 

Monday, 28 May 2018

Retired Accountant Wins Big After Tiny Bet


Punter wins a fortune for small bet
Imagine placing a tiny bet of £1 then picking five winning horses in a row on the same day, to net yourself a nice little pay cheque of nearly £60,000.

That’s what happened to Peter Titman when he managed to back all the right horses to race over the line first at York last weekend.

Playing a “Lucky 31” accumulator bet, his initial winnings were £38,901 after the horses El Astronaute, Roaring Lion, Afaak, Main Desire and Waiting for Richie all won their races on Thursday.

To make a Lucky 31 more appealing to punters, customers playing will all receive a fifty percent bonus if they can correctly pick five winners. Whilst each Lucky 31 bet will essentially cost a punter £31, Peter’s remarkable win took his eventual total to a staggering £58,352.

His long term betting pal didn’t make the races

On the day, Titman also believes his gaming luck was possibly increased by the fact his long term pal and betting friend Ian Carr didn’t make the day out as he was attending a hospital appointment.

Mr Titman who hails from Royton near Oldham in Greater Manchester spoke to the Manchester Evening News after his astonishing win and said that:
“I was always good at mental arithmetic and my uncle had me checking not only his, but his mates’ betting slips. I must have been seven or eight years of age but I could do my sums pretty well. At primary school the teachers used to ask my puzzled parents why I knew so much about horse racing and whether they were big gamblers, which they weren’t”

He went on to say that he was always top of the class in Maths at school and had actually at one point considered going into accountancy as a career.

Special win

Peter who is by his own confession a massive huge Oldham Athletic fan, jokingly said that the win was even more special to him because the bet was created by a Manchester United fan!

Laughing, he commented that
“I’m an Oldham fan and we were relegated after failing to match Rochdale’s result on the last day of the season, so taking £58,000 off a big United fan like Fred has cheered me up.”

Titman
picked up his winnings at the betting shop near his house and then went on to celebrate his win in his local pub. Then there was a good meal at a local restaurant for some of his friends.

He intends to spend the money on a new computer and will also possibly consider putting some of it towards getting a lovely holiday home in Lanzarote.

He finally added
"I’m just starting to get over our miserable stop-start FA Cup final defeat against Chelsea when we weren’t at the races and then I hear about this. Guess it proves you can always win big from a small stake at Betfred, and at least a very loyal customer is in the money.”

Thursday, 24 May 2018

A beginner’s guide to betting on Horse Racing

The Winner's Enclosure - Racing Tips & Offers
Sports betting is ever-present these days, with many punters looking to beat the bookies. If you’re looking for the best horse racing tips but aren’t sure where to start, we take you through the best practices when dabbling with horse racing bets. 

If you’re always on the lookout for help picking your bets then you should check out The Winners Enclosure for the best horse racing tips. This site offers free tips as well as previews and reviews of some of the biggest events throughout the racing calendar. As well as keeping you up to date with all the latest racing news that may help to influence your bet-picking. 

No bet or tip is ever a certainty to win of course, so you should only ever bet what you can afford. Betting responsibly should always be put ahead of all else when you’re looking at any sort of bet. 

What sort of bet to go for? 

Horse Racing is perhaps one of the most complex sports to bet on due to the wide variety of bets on offer. This can seem daunting at first but once you get to grips with the various terms and bets it’s relatively straightforward. One of the benefits of using racing tipster sites such as The Winners Enclosure is that they provide an extensive break-down of these terms and bets, as well as offering their own suggested bets for you to back on a daily basis.

Choosing the right bookmaker 

There’s plenty of bookies out there that give great racing offers and bonuses to punters. Most will now offer some sort of sign-up bonus, such as free bets or your first stake returned should it lose. It’s well worth shopping around to find the best odds, The Winners Enclosure have a section on their website dedicated to informing punters of exactly what is on offer from a variety of bookmakers. 

Shopping around can also pay when it comes to finding the best odds. These can of course differ from one bookie to the next, so having a look at a few is well worth it before you place your bet. Some will also offer racing specials such as price boosts, enhancements, paying out more places, or betting through the card offers – where a bet on the first race at a meeting entitles you for free bets for the rest of the day/festival.

Friday, 18 May 2018

Penny Up: Childhood Gambling...

I noticed this article about child gambling. It is the kind of game children play, or did. In these modern times they probably play a tenner-a-time competing on Wii. 

Child gambling. It makes for an interesting debate. So what are your thoughts on how to approach the subject of gambling for your children or views on it in general? 

Are you anti gambling for wee nippers or can they learn a valuable lesson? 

I can remember as a child going to the amusement arcade with my tub of coppers. It was fun at the time and in ways it was a good thing because I can't stand fruit machines now. 

In a world of gambling temptation - for young and old - is it wise to allow children to gamble? Or does stopping them just make it all the more interesting? Life is one endless gamble, hey. I don't fancy your odds of walking on the moon. I am sure many of you can relate to Penny Up, which brings back memories from dare I say it school day fun. I can remember a teacher catching us playing at break time and instead of going mad had a game himself. Oh' the good old days...  


Lesser Known Casino Games: Penny Up


Call it “Penny Up”, “Penny in the Crack”, or “Penny Up the Wall” - it’s all the same game. Take a group of people and toss a penny toward a wall. Whoever gets their penny closest to the wall wins!

Penny Up is the first “real” gambling game most people encounter in their lives. Hey, let’s face it - we all know about poker, betting on sports, and other common gambling games growing up. However, knowing about something and being able to play are two different things. It’s easier to carry a pocketful of pennies for Penny up as opposed to a deck of cards and Poker chips. And we’re pretty sure not many ten year olds are able to place a bet on the horses at the track.

The rules are so easy that a child could understand. Two people will stand next to each other. Both people are the same distance from the wall. Two pennies are tossed and if your penny is the closest you win the loser’s penny. Sometimes the rare “Stander” (a penny on its side) wins double.

Despite the usage of “Penny” in Penny Up, the game can be played with any coin. Toss two dollar coins and the game is still the same. Get closest and you win the other persons coin. Keep in mind that other people besides children can play. It’s just most adults don’t gamble for pennies. In this case, they will bet dollars (pounds, euros, etc) and pitch pennies.

Normally only two people will play at a time since tracking more than two pennies is hard. The game has no set limits - players will play as long as they like (or until the school bell rings in some cases.)

Although many of us enjoyed Penny Up growing up, it has its critics. Many parents and anti-gambling groups see it as a way to groom children for a life of gambling. The arguments for each side are as follows.

The “Nay” group feels “Allowing children to gamble teaches them it’s alright to do so and even encourages them. These children will grow up to be problem gamblers."

The “Yea” group’s viewpoint is: “Teaching children about gambling in a responsible setting removes the mystery and allows parents to educate their children about the pros and cons of gambling.”

Both sides have valid viewpoints and we’re sure the truth lies somewhere in the middle. We don’t want our children running mini casinos in the playground but we also don’t want to make something so forbidden it becomes irresistible.

Sunday, 6 May 2018

4:10 Newmarket Racing Tips (6th May)

Horse racing - Newmarket
Havana Gold Maiden Stakes (Plus 10) over 5f on good going. 

Seven two-year-olds take part: two with racecourse experience.

Hugo Palmer has started this two-year-old season in earnest and Barend Boy ran a cracking race on debut at Leicester. To be fair, this British-bred son of Oasis Dream didn't look like he was going to trouble the leaders when made 9/4f. However, this bay colt really found his stride in the closing furlong and could well have beaten Marie's Diamond if inexperience hadn't proved costly. Palmer has given this youngster an entry for the Lily Agnes but this option looks to have taken preference. With that valuable experience onside, I can see Barend Boy taking some stopping. Should enjoy this stiff finish. 

Mark Johnston has been in pretty good form this early season if not quite achieving the dizzy heights of former seasons. Smile A Mile was made an odds-on shot for his debut at Newcastle but failed to shine. This chestnut son of Slade Power must have been expected to do better. A recent entry for the Lily Agnes Stakes adds to those thoughts. A horse on a recovery mission but one that is likely to show more today. 

Fly The Nest is trained by Charlie Appleby. This March foal cost 200,000 euros at the yearling sales. The stable won this race last year with a debutante so worthy of respect. Godolphin juveniles often make their presence felt at this course. 

A selection of top-class trainers and interesting debutantes.

William Haggas has not had the best start to proceedings with a handful of two-year-olds seen out so far. He managed to find a winner at Yarmouth but a few other prospects have disappointed. He often unleashes a talent at Newmarket although can be a touch unpredictable with debutantes. Fanaar is owned by Hamdan Al Maktoum. This son of Dark Angel cost £240,000 at the yearling sales. Interesting. 

Clive Cox is a smart trainer who knows his horses. He can most certainly ready a debutant. He's had a couple of two-year-olds run this season - a winner and runner-up. Conchek is a black son of Lethal Force. He is an 85,000G yearling purchase. The mare, Soar, was a smart horse who raced up to Group 1. She won on debut and finished runner-up on her second start when contesting the Queen Mary Stakes (Group 2) at Royal Ascot, going on to win her next two starts at Group 3 and Group 2, respectively. If priced 13/2 & less SP has sound each-way claims. 

Andrew Balding is one of my favourite trainers of two-year-olds. Most seem primed to win on their second start but can win of debut if talented. Oloroso is priced 25/1 which suggests this son of Fast Company isn't expected today. He cost 27,000G at the yearling sales.

Richard Hannon fields Coco Cheval, the only filly in the line up. This chestnut daughter of Kyllachy will need to be pretty smart and primed to depose the colts. She cost 57,00 euros at the yearling sales. The mare didn't achieve anything of note. 

Conclusion: This looks a competitive race. Smile A Mile needs to find much improvement after disappointing on debut at odds-on. However, the betting that day tells the stable were left scratching their head. A recent Lily Agnes entry details they haven't lost hope. I suspect he will go well. I was impressed by Barend Boy on hos first start. This course - with a stiff finish - looks ideal and I would imagine anything that beats him is decent. If pressed, I would make this horse my tip. Fly The Nest cost a lot of money and hails from a stable who usually send their better prospects to compete at Newmarket. Fanaar is another expensive buy. I do like Haggas' juveniles at Newmarket. They can be difficult to predict and often priced to chance. I wouldn't knock this horse. The betting is the best guide to Conchek. If priced 13/2 & less SP is another who will be coming here with some ambition. I would let the betting settle before jumping in just in case it pinpoints one or two weak links. I would have to take a watching brief with just two places for seven runners. A race which will identify a number of future winners.

Tuesday, 1 May 2018

My Adventure Into Lay Betting: Trying To Miss The Giraffe...

One of my favourite quotes is that even a broken watch is right twice a day. As a gambler I think most of us would like to have a better strike rate! Damn Watch.

Rambling...


Nothing changes, hey. I'm either quiet or you suffer from unending prose. The blog timeline details: spam, nothing, more spam, and My Adventure Into Lay Betting: Trying To Miss The Giraffe. [written 2013]


That latter topic sounds much more interesting. This adventure related to my laying horses to lose. That's two-year-old horses. I don't  understand anything else. Now, I'm not going to talk too much about my approach or the philosophy behind my laying tactics because it is a work in progress and rather boring in its written form. 

I must admit I don't find any form of gambling particularly pleasurable. My reasoning is that I have the odds in my favour. As every speculator will appreciate, that betting slip (in mind if not in hand) often morphs into a stick of dynamite.  The fuse burning too damn quick. Lay betting can feel rather daunting. When you've laid the rag and it's travelling with the zeal of a six-to-four jolly it makes the eyes bulge, the heart race, and your pocket has a kind of lost empty feel. Not very jovial. Well, that's the nature of the beast. Equine. You know, those things the commentator keeps talking about. 


So how did the season go?


Well, I was amazed. I know what you are thinking? Is that a good or bad amazing? I just took a double-take to see if my hand had been blown off. 


For the most part it was amazingly good - with a slight disaster at the finish.


I started small laying juveniles to win five pounds a time. That may seem a pittance but it can be a costly affair if a 20/1 shot has an exceptionally long neck. I'm pretty sure I laid a couple of giraffe this year.Last time I go to the bloody zoo and say what lovely creatures. I'm not against laying a good few horses in the same field. Races would come and go. I'd be winning ten, twenty, fifty pound a race. Everything was going well. Amazingly so. After winning several hundred pounds I considered it was time to lay each horse for twenty pounds. I knew it was a risk but time is money and all that. It made me a little nervous. The  bets ranged from laying favourites to huge outsiders. It can be slightly unnerving to lay a horse which could cost a couple of thousand. I always hope they fall out of the stalls and as fat as a pig. In that moment my potential terror of what could be turns to joy. Righteousness. Being right rather than religious. Obviously, there is good reason why I lay such horses. There is understanding, reason, professionalism. I'm not pinning the tail on the donkey - just trying to find it. However, that doesn't mean any horse cannot win. They do. The beasts. Those chestnut giraffe can be killers. 


To be fair I laid an incredible run of losers. In a matter of months I had turned my five pounds to four thousand. In a sizable field of maidens I would win up to two hundred a race. However, this approach doesn't allow you to just take any old race and wave my stick of dynamite. For starters, on many days there would be a limited number of two-year-old races. Certain race types were ignored.


I had a feeling of confidence.


For a moment I considered however fast that fuse burned if I filled my lungs with joyous - winning - air I could blow away that hellish spark.


On occasions I got my fingers burned. You have to remember that although I follow a professional approach there is something very different about working in practice to paper trailing. Thankfully I wasn't hit by a 100/1 shot. That would have been hard to swallow. But if you lay a bet you should never be surprised if it wins. It is probably sensible to imagine it will blow your socks off. I laid a couple of horses which won at 20/1. Not good. Although from my understanding I wasn't wrong in my approach. Horses win, horses lose, that's how it works. I must admit that in those early months of laying what must have been a hundred plus losers on the trot it all seemed ''amazingly'' straight forward. At the back of my mind (often at the front...and certainly in my pocket) I didn't believe it would last. I didn't expect it to follow a scenic path. I've watched  The Wizard of Oz. You have to meet a scarecrow, tin man, lion and a couple of flying monkeys before you get a chance to melt a green-faced witch and steal her bloody shoes. Although - thinking about it -hadn't she already lost them? 


I hit another couple of winners. A few bets cost a good few hundred. Financially it wasn't a problem but psychologically it was tougher. The next few lay bets made me really need them to lose. With a few winning days under my belt I shrugged off the loss and by a week or two I was back to an all-time high. 


However, little by little I hit a plateau. The four thousand pound mark became a wall. Each time I would climb the ladder to look over the other side I would be beaten to it by a giraffe who stuck out an incredibly long tongue. Sure the thing blew a raspberry before it came into view. I went from four thousand. Three thousand. Back to four thousand. Kicked in the nuts by wilder beast. It was a struggle. I didn't feel the approach was wrong. A few of the decisions come down to a photo finish. Prolonged agony. I realised that I needed a tweak here and there. Knock a few trainers on the head because they had done my brain in. That learning curve felt as though it was tying me up in knots. I'm sure that watch stopped when I wasn't looking.


The end of the two-year-old season was on the horizon and I was looking forward to a rest. One of the last bets was a killer blow. It didn't finish me off but it dampened my spirits which were already low. Of all days. I had been to the funeral of my aunt and switched on the races to see a Luca Cumani debutant which I laid for twenty pounds. The favourite struggled. In turn I had an uneasy feeling...which continued to cause concern. The beast travelled like a gazelle. I gave up trying to work out whether its neck was long or short. Its legs moved fast. It hit the front, cruising Kempton's final bend and lengthened clear into the straight. The loss I had expected materialised costing nearly eight hundred pounds. It wasn't the best of feelings. 


I'll be back next year with my tranquilizer dart.



Wednesday, 25 April 2018

The Legend of Arkle:

Arkle Race Horse
There have been many great horses that have achieved great racing honours. Red Rum won the prestigious Grand National for three times and Best Mate won the Cheltenham Gold Cup three times as well. Yet none of them could quite match the appeal of Arkle. Even the people with no interest in racing would know his name and praise his talents. His name still evokes many emotions among the Irish people. Peter O'Sullevan, the famous racing commentator, called him a freak of nature — something unlikely to be seen again.

His jumping was not perfect, still his imperfections only added to his magical personality. His dominance was so complete in the race that the racing authorities in Ireland at that time had to change the handicapping rules because of him.

The Arkle Challenge Trophy at Cheltenham Festival is named after him as a way to pay tribute. The Cheltenham Festival is very near now which takes place in the month of March every year. It is the best place for all the punters. That is why a huge conversation is generating about the prospects of different horses. Will the horses of Wille Mullins shine on the field or will it be the horses of Nicky Henderson or Jessica Harrington who will steal the show? These questions are being debated with great intensity among the punters.

Therefore, do not miss the opportunity to cash in on the mega festival which goes on for 4 days. Choose freebets if you want to get the most out of your bucks. For here you will find all the updates, tips and predictions in order to help you with your punting. You can find all the leading bookmakers here from Paddy Power to Ladbrokes to William Hill etc.

So find your free bets for Cheltenham from the top bookmakers. Choose Paddy Power for it is offering Non Runner No Bet along with their offering of £20 Risk Free bet. Chose Betway for its free bets could go up to £30. Or may be you would like the offer of Bet £10 Get £30 of 888Sports. Coral, Betfred and Bet365 are also offering some of the best offers.

After winning the 1963 Broadway Chase, Arkle faced Mill House (the Cheltenham Gold Cup winner) for the first time in the 1963 Hennessy Gold Cup, and he lost that race against Mill House. However, Arkle took his revenge in the Cheltenham Gold Cup of 1964 by beating Mill House by five lengths. It was his first Gold Cup win and it was the last time he was not featured as favourite for a race.

In the next Gold Cup of 1965, he easily defeated Mill House by 20 lengths. And in the 1966 Gold Cup, he grabbed another victory by an outstanding 30 lengths. In that race, he even made an early mistake but his momentum remained steady and he got such a dominating victory. That season of 1965-66, the legendary Arkle remained unbeaten in 5 races.

In the three years; Arkle acheived such a huge racing honour for himself, winning a King George VI Chase and 3 consecutive Cheltenham Gold Cups. Besides these wins, he also won the Hennessy Gold Cup, the Irish Grand National, the Whitbread Gold Cup and the Gallagher Gold Cup.

Tragically, Arkle got a serious injury during racing in the King George VI Chase at Kempton Park. He hit the guard rail resulting in a fractured pedal bone while jumping the open ditch. Even then, the legendary Arkle completed the race and almost won by coming in second.
The injury stopped him from running ever again, although he made enough recovery to get back into training. He became hugely famous in Ireland. Even at one point Arkle for President was written on a Dublin wall. He was simply referred as "Himself".